Goby hits IUCN Species Forum

The IUCN Species Forum earlier this month was a positive experience for WCS Fiji’s Kini Koto (aka KK), who attended the conference to present some of our work, and to distribute copies of The Adventures of Joji Goby, our comic. The conference theme of Moving from Science to Conservation focused minds on trying to restore and maintain some of the world’s Critically Endangered, Endangered, Vulnerable and endemic species.

KK presented on Human and climate impacts on decline of Fiji’s threatened freshwater fishes – a topic about which the audience had plenty of questions regarding the threats faced by these fish and the conservation actions being taken. WCS Fiji, in Moving from Science to Conservation, have carried out marine and freshwater scientific research, and provided the results of this research back to communities through consultation workshops. These workshops are designed to help communities learn about best-practice for looking after their natural resources, and to identify the best locations to protect in order to conserve these resources. Future food security is a major consideration in these decisions, since rural communities in Vanua Levu depend heavily on the environment to provide their subsistence needs. Communities sit together – either in villages or tribes – as they decide on protected areas covering their forests, rivers, mangroves and coral reefs. After drawing the protected area (tabu) boundaries, the communities write management rules for these areas and for the wider district.

Not only does the process of establishing management rules involve the men, women and youth from each village, but WCS Fiji are also getting the attention of school children, through a comic book about the adventurous lifecycle of a freshwater goby. The comic book is presented to schools alongside a puppet show to bring the conservation message to life (KK plays the hero, Joji Goby, in the show!). KK was delighted to hand-deliver the comic book to the Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands, Gordon Darcy Lilo, who was a special guest at the IUCN Species Forum. The icing on the cake was an invitation from Dr Simon Stuart, Chair of the IUCN Species Survival Commission, who asked WCS Fiji to become a member of the IUCN/Wetlands International Freshwater Fish Specialist group.

The production of the comic book and puppet shows were made possible by the kind support of the Disney Friends for Change Programme.

Joji Goby and his friends Crab and Snail

Give coral reefs a chance

It was a pleasure conducting the reef resilience “Training of Trainers” workshop in Suva in February. As a part of the outcomes of the training, and requests from participants, WCS Fiji has developed community-friendly posters on:

1. Spotting signs of stress on your reef

2. Considerations for a resilient marine protected area

Please get in touch through infofiji@wcs.org if you would like copies of these posters to help your community better manage their marine resources!

This project was kindly supported by grants from The Nature Conservancy and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (US Department of Commerce).

                                             

 

New Fish Wardens for 2012

In order to maintain sustainable resources for future generations in the Provinces of Cakaudrove and Bua in Vanua Levu, the communities of Wailevu, Wainunu, Nadi and Solevu have selected some members of their communities to be trained as fish wardens. These fish wardens will be empowered to see that their resources are use in an appropriate way.

This project was kindly supported by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two 3-day training sessions for the 2012 fish wardens were held: first in Natuvu, Wailevu district, and then in Navatu, Kubulau district. The training in Wailevu was officially opened by the Provincial Administrator Mr Uraia Rainima, and the Roko Tui Cakaudrove Ro Aca Mataitinihad was our chief guest who gave the certificates to the participants on the final day of the training and also officially closed the training.

There were 42 participants that attended the training in Natuvu, 30 participants were from the district of Wailevu and 12 participants were from the neighbouring districts of Somosomo, Saqani, Nakomo, Nanuca and Lekutu. WCS Fiji’s Waisea Naisilisili and Sirilo Dulunaqio were delighted to receive the training to become fish wardens themselves. In Navatu there were 27 participants, 15 from Kubulau and 12 from the neighbouring districts of Wainunu, Nadi and Solevu.

The Kubulau fish warden training was officially opened by Tomasi Cama; in his opening speech he addressed the importance of our connection to our environment through our totem fish, plants and animals. The fish warden training was conducted by Joji Vakawaletabua (Fisheries Department Nasavusavu), Tomasi Cama (Fisheries Department Bua), Nanise Kuridrani Tuqiri and Epeli Tawake (Fisheries Department Labasa) and a police officer from Nasavusavu.

To end the workshop on a positive note, on the final day of the training we managed to tag a male Hawksbill turtle and the participants named it Tui Navatu. Tui Navatu was tagged and released by the two heads of the tribe (yavusa) in Navatu, as the participants looked on. This was a memorable day as we also celebrated the reef enrichment initiative which was launched in April. The training in Kubulau was officially closed by Joji, who reminded us that we are inter-dependent with the environment: we depend on our resources and our resources depend on us.

Communities learn about sustainable land management

After a request from the Kubulau Resource Management Committee to be trained on the methods of building community nurseries and on Sustainable Land Management (SLM) practices, the fifth module of Community Educators Network (CEN) Training was completed last week. Participants from each of the 10 villages of Kubulau attended the 2-day workshop in Namalata Village, Kubulau District. The workshop facilitated by WCS Fiji and the Coral Reef Alliance with collaboration from the Forestry Department and the Department of Agriculture’s Land Use Planning Section.

The first part of this training focused on watershed conservation, coastal and watershed restoration and the the theoretical and practical techniques of building a community nursery. This entailed a field visit to the Naravuka Village nursery in Seaqaqa for the participants to witness first-hand how a simple community nursery is constructed and the benefits and challenges of having a community nursery.

This project was kindly supported by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Land Use Planning Section of the Department of Agriculture explained Sustainable Land Management (SLM) practices to the participants, followed by field trips to Montfort Technical Institute to observe their integrated farming system, and to the Vuniyasawa Village’s vetiver grass project to view how soil erosion on hill slopes could be managed by planting vetiver grass.

This CEN Training was very informative and thoroughly enjoyed by the participants, particularly the field visits, which provided them the practical knowledge on how to make the theories learnt become a reality.

 

Wailevu communities moving forward together

Communities in Wailevu came together in April to finalise plans promoting sustainable use and conservation of their natural resources.

Wailevu is siituated in the province of Cakaudrove in Vanua Levu. Consisting of 30 villages and significant settlements, it is geographically the largest district in Fiji. Well known for farming dalo and yaqona, the district is also home to Waisali Forest Reserve, the Mount Kasi gold mine, an established pearl farm and a range of community eco-tourism sites.

Building on the success of Ecosystem-Based Management (EBM) in neighbouring Kubulau, WCS Fiji is supporting Wailevu communities to develop a collaborative plan through which to protect local habitats, promote sustainable resource management and enhance quality of life.

The plan will be implemented and monitored by a Resource Management Committee in Wailevu West and another in the East of the district. “It is good to see such strong support from all the villages. With the backing of our Chiefs, we have been working together to identify tabu areas and management rules that will preserve our resources for future generations” stated Timoci Rokosuli, Chairman of the Wailevu West Resource Management Committee. “We thank WCS for their support and look forward to working together for the benefit of Wailevu”.

A range of stakeholders have also been involved in developing the plans. Jone Vakamino from the Cakaudrove Yaubula Management Support Team said he had attended several workshops in the past six months. “The Roko Tui has seen the value of this work and the Provincial Council is actively supportive”, he stated “the communities are taking responsibility to ensure a healthy environment. This can also benefit them economically, with potential for ecotourism projects like the one that is growing in Bagata”.

EBM fuses scientific principles with local and traditional ecological knowledge to promote sustainable management of terrestrial, freshwater, estuarine, coastal and marine habitats. It aims to maintain healthy, productive and resilient ecosystems that can overcome pressure from population growth and climate change to meet the needs of future generations.